NC State Announces 2016 NHLA Hardwood Lumber Grading Workshop

NHLA HARDWOOD LUMBER GRADING WORKSHOP

Sponsored by the Southeastern Dry Kiln Club
June 14 – 16, 2016
NC State University
Raleigh, NC

The value of “rules conscious” employees is a more carefully manufactured product, a more profitable yield from the log, and a better sense of the value of the lumber being handled. This three-day workshop will include a thorough study and explanation of the NHLA Rules Book, emphasizing the basics of hardwood lumber inspection.  This popular workshop gives yardmen, sawyers, edgermen, sales and office staff, as well as management level personnel an introduction to lumber inspection. This course is designed as an introduction and a refresher course of the NHLA Rules. The course will cover the fundamental of hardwood lumber inspection and will give the attendees the opportunity for hands-on application of the rules.

For more information:   go.ncsu.edu/hardwood-lumber-grading

May 2016 Graduates Looking for Full-Time Employment: Summer Interns Available

NC State University’s Sustainable Materials and Technology (SMT) program (formerly the Wood Products program) is part of the Forest Biomaterials Department.  SMT is an applied material science and engineering program focused on the economic, environmental, and social attributes of renewable materials (of which wood is the premier sustainable material). Our program provides specialized training and hands on experience regarding the responsible use of plant-based materials.  There are currently over 100 students working on their undergraduate degree in SMT, which is about triple the enrollment before the name change.
The Department of Forest Biomaterials at NC State offers employers access to a well-trained pool of the best and brightest young professionals in the sustainable materials and allied industries today.  We invite the Forest Products industry to consider our students for either full-time employment, or employment as a summer intern.
In addition to our graduates, SMT students are required to complete at least one summer internship in the industry.  Summer internships are a great opportunity for students to learn about the industry and to earn some money at the same time.  For the industry, having a summer intern is a means to hire temporary summer labor and evaluate that individual for possible future employment.
Please take a look at our Recruiter resources page:
Or, an employer can make an interview day request online:
Our Forest Biomaterials Career Services Coordinator is on temporary leave.  This Spring we are happy to have Cheryl Gill fill in.  You may contact her at:
Cheryl Gill               cgill@ncsu.edu                             (919) 515-2888
You may also contact either:
Phil Mitchell             phil_mitchell@ncsu.edu               (919) 515-5581
Perry Peralta           perry_peralta@ncsu.edu              (919) 515-5731

NC State announces Dry Kiln Operator’s Workshop to be held in May

ANNUAL HARDWOOD DRY KILN OPERATOR’S SHORT COURSE
Sponsored by the Southeastern Dry Kiln Club
May 17 – 20, 2016
NC State University
Raleigh, NC

This short course will provide practical knowledge about how lumber is effectively kiln dried and scientific background on related wood properties and processes.  It will have value for the beginner as well as experienced kiln operators and with supervisors, sales, and marketing personnel.  Instruction, by university faculty and industry experts, will be both in the classroom and through hands-on lab exercises using our 1000 BF steam heated dry kiln.

For program details contact Phil Mitchell at phil_mitchell@ncsu.edu or call 919 515 5581.   Registration and more details are available here.

Finding a Local Sawmill and Dry Kiln

NCSU Wood Products Extension is frequently asked if we know of a local sawmill, or a nearby custom dry kiln. The best source of information that we use comes from the website www.woodweb.com. Small sawmills and dry kiln businesses can self-list their products and services for free at that web site

My colleague Harry Watt has compiled those North Carolina sawmills and dry kilns that were listed in mid-September 2015 by county. That list is posted here for your convenience in an effort to locate landowners and other local businesses and individuals that can process logs and green lumber into kiln dried lumber. Please understand that the list will be evolving over time as new businesses are added and others are dropped, and the reader is encouraged to visit www.woodweb.com to get the most up-to-date listing. We encourage sawmills and kiln drying operations to add themselves to the list if they are not already listed by registering at www.woodweb.com.

Buncombe County
Mountain Sawyers, Warren Keull, 4600 Hendersonville Road, Fletcher, NC 28732, phone 828-684-0007, custom sawing, kiln drying, moulding, planning, straight-line-ripping.

Chatham County
Whispering Pines Farm, Scott Smith, 6588 Beaver Creek Road, New Hill, NC 27562, phone 919-291-0095, www.quartersawnoak.com, custom sawing, kiln drying, moulding, planning, straight-line ripping.

Cherokee County
LegacyWoods, Bart O’Sullivan, 300 Kent Street, Andrews, NC 28901, phone 800-586-LOGS, custom sawing, kiln drying.

Hoke County
Feltz’s Sawmill, Eric Feltz, 903 Myra Road, Raeford, NC 28376, phone 903-875-5827, custom sawing, kiln drying.

Iredell County
Statesville Sawmill & Lumber, Brent Cook, Scotts Creek Road, Statesville, NC 27625, phone 704-682-8084, custom sawing, kiln drying.

Lincoln County
The Sawmill, Kyle Edwards, 5048 Reinhardt Circle, Iron Station, NC 28080, phone 704-258-8985, www.sawmillnc.com, custom sawing, kiln drying.

Macon County
McConnell Millworks, Shane McConnell, 834 Fred Vinson Road, Otto, NC 28763, phone 828-226-7207, custom sawing, kiln drying, moulding, planning, straight-line-ripping.

New Hanover County
Old Growth Riverwood, Chris Metz, 1407 B. Castle Hayne Road, Wilmington, NC 28401, phone 910-762-4077, custom sawing, kiln drying, moulding, planning, straight-line-ripping.

Sampson County
Beaver Branch Sawmill, Ivey Pridgen, 409 Horse Branch Road, phone 910-540-0705, custom sawing, kiln drying.

Short Course on Dehumidification Drying of Lumber

October 8-9, 2015
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina

Registration Deadline: Friday, October 2, 2015 (5PM EDST), limit 25 attendees.

Dehumidification drying can produce high quality kiln dried lumber with a small capital investment.  This short course will provide practical knowledge about using dehumidification to produce kiln dried lumber, and the scientific background on related wood properties. It will have value for those kiln operators beginning to operate a dehumidification kiln and those considering the purchase of a dehumidification kiln. Instruction, by university faculty, will be both in the classroom and through hands-on lab exercises using our 1000 BF laboratory dry kiln equipped with a commercial lumber dehumidification system. For more details: http://www.ncsu-feop.org/biomaterials/

Forest Products Manufacturing is Important to the Biobased Products Economy

Wood Products Extension collaborated with Duke University’s Center for Sustainability and Commerce and NC State’s Supply Chain Resource Cooperative to produce, “An Economic Impact Analysis of the U.S. Biobased Products Industry: A Report to the Congress of the United States of America.” This technical report was prepared for the US Department of Agriculture BioPreferred® program and the Congress of the United States of America as mandated within the 2014 Farm Bill. The report was highlighted in a news release issued by USDA (http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?contentid=2015/06/0175.xml&contentidonly=true).

Seven major overarching sectors that represent the US biobased products industry were analyzed: Agriculture and Forestry, Biorefining, Biobased Chemicals, Enzymes, Bioplastic Bottles and Packaging, Forest Products, and Textiles. The report focused specifically bioproducts, therefore the energy, livestock, food, feed, and pharmaceuticals sectors were excluded.

Briefly, 1.5 million jobs were directly associated with biobased products industry production, which resulted in additional production that supported 1.1 million jobs in supply chain industries. Purchases of goods and services by these 2.6 million workers induced even more production that supported another 1.4 million jobs.

Similarly, $126 billion in value added was generated directly by the biobased products industry. This triggered spillover effects of another $126 billion in indirect value added and $117 billion in induced value added. The total contribution of the biobased products industry to the U.S. economy in 2013 was $369 billion in value added and employment of four million workers. States with the greatest concentrations of biobased products industrial activities were Mississippi, Oregon, Maine, Wisconsin, Idaho, Alabama, North Carolina, Arkansas, and South Dakota.

The leading generator of biobased economic activities in 2013 was Forest Products, which included Wood Products, Paper, and Wood Furniture Manufacturing. Forest Products directly employed nearly 1.1 million workers and produced $94.1 billion in value added, or about three fourths of all the direct contributions of the biobased products industry. Accounting for its indirect and induced effects moved Forest Products’ total contributions to $333.6 billion in value added and 3.54 million employees.

“An Economic Impact Analysis of the U.S. Biobased Products Industry: A Report to the Congress of the United States of America” can be found at http://www.biopreferred.gov/BPResources/files/EconomicReport_6_12_2015.pdf.

Quality Index Developed for Northern Red Oak Logs Based Upon Green Lumber Yields

The Quality Index is a timber measure that dates to the 1940s. It is a single number that expresses the relative value of a log as determined by the value of different grades of 4/4 lumber that can be sawn from it. A great deal of research on Quality Indexes was conducted by the US Forest Service in the 1960s and 1970s as part of its Hardwood Improvement Project.

The Quality Index has many applications. One is its ability to place an objective value on a factory grade hardwood log based upon its predicted lumber grade yields (the factory grade designation means the log will be sawn into lumber). Secondly, when utilized in conjunction with Tree Value Conversion Standards, a conversion return for hardwood sawtimber can be realized. Ultimately, the Quality Index can applied as part of a financial maturity assessment of individual hardwood trees or stands.

We initiated research last winter to develop Quality Indexes for oak logs. Our recently completed Quality Index for Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) was created by simulating green lumber board foot yields from a range of logs, which varied by diameter, length, and scaling defect. We assumed the log was sawn entirely into 4/4 lumber. By considering green 4/4 lumber as our finished product, we were able to isolate the drying process (and any subsequent changes in product value) from our simulation. Grading criteria followed the US Forest Service’s log grading rules. The model used to predict green lumber yields was also originally developed by the US Forest Service.

You can find the Northern Red Oak Quality Index on the Publications page of our website. A presentation on its background and use accompanies the index tables. Two indexes are provided for Northern Red Oak logs. One is for the southern Appalachian region, and one is for the southern US. These regions follow lumber market areas developed by the Hardwood Review. Please feel free to contact me should you desire further information on the Quality Index, eric_mcconnell@ncsu.edu.

NC State Announces NHLA Hardwood Lumber Grading Workshop

NHLA HARDWOOD LUMBER GRADING WORKSHOP

Sponsored by the SouthEastern Dry Kiln Club
July 21 – 23, 2015
NC State University
Raleigh, NC

The value of “rules conscious” employees is a more carefully manufactured product, a more profitable yield from the log, and a better sense of the value of the lumber being handled. This three-day workshop will include a thorough study and explanation of the NHLA Rules Book, emphasizing the basics of hardwood lumber inspection.  This popular workshop gives yardmen, sawyers, edgermen, sales and office staff, as well as management level personnel an introduction to lumber inspection. This course is designed as an introduction and a refresher course of the NHLA Rules. The course will cover the fundamental of hardwood lumber inspection and will give the attendees the opportunity for hands-on application of the rules.

For more information:   go.ncsu.edu/hardwood-lumber-grading

 

NC State Announces Dry Kiln Operator’s Short Course to be Held in May

ANNUAL HARDWOOD DRY KILN OPERATOR’S SHORT COURSE
Sponsored by the Southeastern Dry Kiln Club
May 19 – 22, 2015
NC State University
Raleigh, NC

This short course will provide practical knowledge about how lumber is effectively kiln dried and scientific background on related wood properties and processes.  It will have value for the beginner as well as experienced kiln operators and with supervisors, sales, and marketing personnel.  Instruction, by university faculty and industry experts, will be both in the classroom and through hands-on lab exercises using our 1000 BF steam heated dry kiln.

For more details contact Phil Mitchell at phil_mitchell@ncsu.edu or call 919 515 5581 or download the brochure.

Wood Products Extension Partners to Define the Economic Contributions of the Biobased Products Industry

 

Biobasd Products

Earlier this year Wood Products Extension was approached by members of Duke University’s Center for Sustainability and Commerce and North Carolina State University’s Poole College of Management to collaborate on the project, “An Economic and Environmental Analysis of the U.S. Biobased Products Industry.” This will be a follow-up to an earlier report released in October, 2014, under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Biopreferred Program titled “Why Biobased? Opportunities in the Emerging Bioeconomy”. The “Why Biobased?” report can be found at https://www.biopreferred.gov/BPResources/files/WhyBiobased.pdf.

This series of reports was mandated in the most recent re-authorization of the Farm Bill. The joint team from Duke and NC State are leading the Report of Findings being undertaken for USDA, which will later be delivered to the Congress of the United States.

The current project has involved a comprehensive assessment of the impacts of specific bio-based segments within the U.S. economy, which were categorized under Agriculture and Forestry, Biorefining, Textiles and Apparels, Forest Products Manufacturing, Biochemicals, Enzymes, and Biobased Plastics and Packaging. The report is centered on Biobased Products and as such does not focus on biobased fuels or other energy sources except when analyzing co-products.

The significance of our present work is in part due to the lack of prior efforts to examine and quantify the impact of the U.S. Biobased Products industry from an economics, jobs, as well as environmental perspective. The findings of this report are intended to provide an initial effort and platform from which to build upon for future efforts, as more structured reporting and tracking mechanisms are developed.

We recently concluded obtaining our economic impact results and have begun drafting a report of our findings. Last month, we presented an update of our progress in a meeting with the Office of the Chief Economist at USDA in Washington DC, and the results were well received by all in attendance. A workshop for industry leaders is being planned for the summer that will offer an opportunity to comment and provide input on the report’s findings.

Team members for “An Economic and Environmental Analysis of the U.S. Biobased Products Industry” are Dr. Jay Golden, Duke University Center for Sustainability and Commerce; Dr. Robert Handfield, North Carolina State University Poole College of Management; Dr. Jesse Daystar, Duke University Center for Sustainability and Commerce; and Dr. Eric McConnell, North Carolina State University Department of Forest Biomaterials and Wood Products Extension.